Course Title : Legal English
Code Course
Type
Regular
Semester
Lecture
(hours/week)
Seminar
(hours/week)
Lab
(hours/week)
Credits ECTS
LAW 205-1 A -1 3 0 0 3.00 5
Lecturer and Office Hours
Teaching Assistant and Office Hours
Language
Course Level
Description This course aims at giving participants an overview of the constitutional & institutional law of the legal terminology using all the relevant English legal terminology. Students will become familiar with the language of the treaties and the institutions as well as introducing them to the most important themes in law.
Objectives Having completed this class, participants should be able to communicate freely in English about all of the major issues in legal English. Although legal English is diverse having in mind the distinction between common law and civil law, knowledge of all relevant issues and terms in English is indespensible to all lawyers. Providing this ability will be the main object of this class.
Course Outline
WeekTopics
1Presentation of Module
2The two major legal systems of the western world are the Civil System, relevant in Western Europe, and the 'Common Law' System, relevant in the Anglo-Saxon countries. These two major legal traditions have similiarity, as both are products of Western culture, but considerable differences exist between them. The courts in the civil system are profoundly influenced by Roman law, and in particular by a corpus of civil law known as the "Corpus iuris civilis". This theory of the civil system was rediscovered around the end of the eleventh century and became the basis for the study of Law in medieval Universities, beginning in Bologna and then spreading throughout Europe. The Civil System can be divided into two subgroups, the Franco-Italian Systems and the German Systems. In this lecture students will be introduced to the English legal terminology of these two systems and the difference between these two systems. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 8-9. 2. Amy Krois-Lindner, International Legal English Student's Book with Audio CDs: A Course for Classroom or Self-Study Use (Cambridge University Press 2006) 8-9.
3Sources of law One of the main elements of the state lies in the possibility of preparing binding rules created to maintain and discipline the state itself; its relations with other states, the state's relations with citizens and the relations of citizens between them. These binding rules for all, and for those who issue them, constitute the sources of a state's right. During the lecture, the sources of law and their hierarchy will be treated in English legal terminology. The ‘common law’ and ‘civil law’ systems will be considered as a reference. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 10-13. 2. Rawdon Wyatt, Check your English Vocabulary for Law (A&C Black 2006) 1.
4Organization of the Judiciary and Dispute Resolution Judicial power is exercised only by the Courts and Prosecution Offices, in accordance with the Constitution and the powers vested in them by law. Judges have the power to review all criminal, military, civil, administrative, and other matters determined by law. While prosecutors have the duty to participate only in criminal court cases. This lecture will address the judiciary in the ‘common law’ system taking as an example the United Kingdom and the ‘civil law’ system referring to the case of Albania. During the lecture, students will be introduced to the basic concepts and will be able to discuss in English about: i) the organization of the judiciary; ii) main functions; and iii) the types of sentences handed down by the courts. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 14-15. 2. Amy Krois-Lindner, International Legal English Student's Book with Audio CDs: A Course for Classroom or Self-Study Use (Cambridge University Press 2006) 10-13. 3. Rawdon Wyatt, Check your English Vocabulary for Law (A&C Black 2006) 23.
5Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure In this lecture, substantive and procedural criminal law will be treated in English legal terminology. The definition of criminal law and procedure will be explained during the lecture. The following will then be addressed: i) major crimes; ii) the meaning of the offense and the criminal figure and ii) the main concepts and institutes in the criminal legislation that regulate the criminal proceedings in all its stages. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 16-17; 2. Rawdon Wyatt, Check your English Vocabulary for Law (A&C Black 2006) 25-29.
6Civil Law and Civil Procedure Civil Law as a positive branch of law in the legal system of any state, with its legal norms, represents a legal regulator of social relations of property character, respectively of legal-civil relations (legal-property relations, legal-obligatory relations, and legal-hereditary relations). While civil procedural law is defined as a system of legal norms, which regulate the formation and organization of courts and arbitration, the bailiff service and other bodies that due to their legal activity are related to the courts, regulate the activity and the procedural relations that arise between the procedural subjects during this activity. This lecture will address in English legal terminology the key concepts in civil law and procedure. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 18-19.
7Arbitration Recently, instead of a procedure before a judge, international arbitration has received great development. Arbitration is conducted before elected persons called arbitrators and is a neutral, private and consensual way of resolving disputes. The decision given is binding and must be respected by all parties. Compared to court proceedings, arbitration is faster and less costly. This lecture will focus on: i) the definition of arbitration; ii) composition and procedure and iii) international arbitration institutions. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 20-21. 2. Rawdon Wyatt, Check your English Vocabulary for Law (A&C Black 2006) 31.
8Midterm Exam
9European Union law European Union law is a unique legal system which operates in conjunction with the laws of the member states of the European Union (EU). The EU has laws that have direct effect within the legal system of the member states, and has supremacy over the national law of the EU member states. This lecture will focus on general information in English of: i) sources of EU law; ii) main institutions and their composition; iii) legal acts and iv) fundamental freedoms that constitute the internal market. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 22-23. 2. Rawdon Wyatt, Check your English Vocabulary for Law (A&C Black 2006) 34.
10Law enforcement actors This lecture will address law enforcement actors under the ‘common law’ and ‘civil law’ legal system. Students will be introduced to the English language terminology of actors, emphasizing the difference between the two legal systems. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 24-31. 2. Rawdon Wyatt, Check your English Vocabulary for Law (A&C Black 2006) 47-50.
11Law Office Structure After getting to know the key actors in law enforcement, the lecture will focus on the organizational structure of an international law office and the role of the lawyer. Dividing into different areas of specialization or departments is the success of a law firm. Taking into account the knowledge acquired so far, students will be introduced to: i) the employment procedure and ii) the responsibilities and duties of the legal assistant. At the end, students will be able to talk in English about the organization and structure of the law office. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 32-33.
12Legal memoirs: Issues and facts This lecture deals with legal memoirs in English. Memos help to convey information more effectively. Students will be introduced to: i) the structure of the legal memo; ii) legal memo writing format; iii) characteristics of the memo structure. Some examples of memos in English will be analyzed during the lecture in order for students to identify the facts of the case, the reasoning and the decision. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 40-41.
13Legal Correspondence This lecture focuses on legal correspondence. It is important for students to be familiar with the proper way of legal correspondence. Practical examples will be analyzed in the classroom and the student will be put in the position of a lawyer, who must communicate with his clients about a case a. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 34-35; 38-39.
14Latin Legal Terminology Latin expressions often appear in English texts. These expressions, during translations, are usually replaced with equivalent Albanian expressions, based on the meaning they have or starting from the versions translated into other foreign languages. This lecture deals with the most commonly used Latin legal expressions and the way of writing in an academic paper. Relevant literature: 1. Eric Glendinning, Professional English in Use law (Cambridge University Press 2006) 42-43. 2. Rawdon Wyatt, Check your English Vocabulary for Law (A&C Black 2006) 45.
15Legal citation of laws, court cases, legal opinions This lecture focuses on legal citation of laws, court cases, legal opinions and secondary sources. First, students will be introduced to different ways of quoting like Harvard, Chicago or MLA. The lecture will then focus on the OSCOLA quote most used by law students. During the lecture concrete examples will be highlighted in order for students to identify the necessary elements that they should reflect in the footnote. Relevant literature: 1. Oxford University Standard for the Citation of Legal Authorities (4 edition, Faculty of Law) 2. Rawdon Wyatt, Check your English Vocabulary for Law (A&C Black 2006) 46
16Final Exam
Prerequisites
Textbook
Other References
Laboratory Work
Computer Usage
Other
Learning Outcomes and Competences
1Pas përfundimit të këtij kursi, studentët do të jenë në gjendje që të përdorin terminologjinë juridike
2Pas përfundimit të këtij kursi, studentët do të jenë në gjendje që të përmisojnë fjalorin e tyre juridik
3Pas përfundimit të këtij kursi, studentët do të jenë në gjendje që të analizojnë cështjet ligjore
4Pas përfundimit të këtij kursi, studentët do të jenë në gjendje që të paraqesin një përmbledhje të rasteve gjyqesore
Course Evaluation Methods
In-term studies Quantity Percentage
Midterms00
Quizzes00
Projects00
Term Projects00
Laboratory00
Attendance00
Contribution of in-term studies to overall grade0
Contribution of final examination to overall grade0
Total0
ECTS (Allocated Based on Student) Workload
Activities Quantity Duration
(hours)
Total Workload
(hours)
Course Duration (Including the exam week : 16 x Total course hours) 16348
Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice) 000
Assignments 000
Midterms 000
Final examination 100
Other 000
Total Work Load 48
Total Work Load / 25 (hours) 1.92
ECTS 2

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